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20131202
20131210
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KQED (PBS) 30
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English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 3, 2013 7:00pm PST
.79. >>> a bad report card on american education. test scores show american students continue to lag in international rankings. according to results from the program for international student assessment, u.s. teenagers ranked below average in math and near average in reading and science. trailing behind countries like japan and china where students of the same age continue to maintain top scores. can this be fixed and what does this mean for businesses and america's competitiveness. here to discuss this, michelle, former chancellor of the public schools in washington d.c. and the ceo and founder of students first. michelle, we're happy to have you. you're such an education expert. let me start with the first question, can this be fixed? because just about every ceo tyler and i talk to are very worried about u.s. competitiveness and, you know, where will they get top talent in the workplace if our kids in school just aren't doing well? do you think? >> it can absolutely be fixed. i hear the same thing from business folks saying they can't find people in the applicant pool that have th
PBS
Dec 3, 2013 3:00pm PST
much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> >> woodruff: next, how the american education system stacks up in global rankings and the questions surrounding that assessment. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: it's considered by many the world's most important exam. the program for international student assessment, or "pisa" test, has been given to 15-year- olds in 65 countries every three years since 2000. a way to test and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency.
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 7:00pm PST
. >> the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a descent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should offend all of us and compel us to action. we're a better country than this. >> so, john, what does the budget have to do with the speech the president gave today? >> well, the president has two goals. one -- the first is do no harm to the economy and if they can get a budget deal, avoid a shut down, that would meet the goal but longer term he has more protective things, raise the minimum wage and spend on education and he may not get those out of this congress but what he's hoping to do is plow the ground for future years, maybe future presidents to make progress on the priorities. >> i'm sure it will create heated debate. thanks for the update, john harwood from washington. >>> still ahead, how safe is your pension whether you work for a city, state or private company? >>> the price of oil moved higher for the fourth session in a row. crude prices up today more than a dollar closing at a five-week high. >>>
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i think that was the great gift of nelson mandela. that he was able to bring people together in a way that made them feel that they could forgive and made them move on. >> woodruff: lydia, one other thing. you wrote t
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 7:30pm PST
on and you think about the key things in our economy that someone has to do to raise a family -- education, healthcare -- these are the most inhat have gone up price meanwhile wages have been flat over the last 12, 13 years, real wages have been flat and insecurity is growing. you mentioned detroit -- time,ns for the first public pensions are on the chopping block in this bankruptcy which have implications for other cities that are stressed fiscally so working people are in a moment here that they haven't time.n in a long gwen: is there a disconnect, david, between what michael is talking about in cities like detroit and at mcdonald's restaurants around the country and what we're seeing in the economically? >> i don't think so. i think the tide is rising, but michael's absolutely right that more and more of the goodies are going to people at the top. blankfine, the c.e.o. of goldman sachs, did an interview with "fortune magazine" and he good at country is very creating wealth but not very good at distributing it and i pickinge president was up on something and you can see municipalities ra
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 12:00am PST
, some in youth, some -- but all passionate about education, passionate all have resources, all have a voice. why aren't we fixing this? >> i think first of all the greatest issue is recognizing the problem. i don't think this problem is clear 10, 20 years ago. i think when world war ii started our army was smaller than in netherlands. we didn't realize how bad hitler was. how terrible nazi party was. we have to recognize it. i think the phase now we say there's 45 million kids in public school. probably half of them, two-thirds will get a decent education, the rest not so good education. that is not only a problem, it's a tragedy. so i think recognizing a problem and people like yourself who are leaders in that just getting the word off. this is not acceptable. this is bad for everybody. that's the first part. that's starting to happen now. there's several things happening to make it better. i think that's very positive. >> rose: are you convinced that we have the will to do what's she is in the will? >> well, i think -- if more people recognize the problem then they say we can do s
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 12:00am PST
investment track records on wall street. he orchestrated a campaign at colleges across the country to educate and mobilize action on entitlement reform and other government spending. he says without a major overhaul soon today's young people will be robbed of the future benefits and standard of living they deserve. i am pleased to have stan druckenmiller at this table. welcome. >> good to see you. >> rose: can i just start with understanding you, you know, this remarkable record with duquesne and with quantum fund and george soros and the relationship you've had. you -- where are you in your life? >> rose: you mean what am i doing? >> yeah. >> i'm still moneying very actively. >> rose: for family or for -- >> for family and the family foundation. i go to work at about 6:00 and i come home at 6:00. i'm still in love with markets. the only thing that's changed is i'm not competing anymore so i'm not managing other people's money but i love markets and i love the intellectual challenge as much as i ever have. >> rose: is that what you love about markets? the intellectual challenge? >> yes, also,
PBS
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
, a conversation about charting a different course in the world of higher education. today, spelman's beverly daniel tatum became one of four college presidents and the first from a historically black institution to receive the carnegie corporation's annual leadership award. the foundation cited her work in encouraging women to pursue careers in the so-called stem fields of science, technology, engineering and math and for her decision to drop intercollegiate sports in favor of student health. beverly tatum joins us now from atlanta. welcome, professor at that time up, president tatum. >> thank you so much. in full disclosure carnegie is one of our funders here at the newshour but i want to ask you who has motivated ou to refocus the academic goals at spelman and whether that is applicable elsewhere. >> well, let me begin by saying that at spelman we have been focused on stem education as well as a broader liberal arts focus for many years. and that doesn't begin with me but i'm happy to say that since i've been president at spelman we've been able to keep moving forward at a time when we se
PBS
Dec 2, 2013 3:00pm PST
with a second look at an education story with big implications for both students and teachers. it's about a new set of standards known as the common core. our special correspondent for education, john merrow, reports. >> you glis can start. >> freedom of speech should mean what it mean, freedom of speep, shouldn't be limitations on freedom. >> i disagree. >> reporter: students in the center of the room argue their case. >> but you have no proof. >> 30 seconds. >> 18 members on the side-lines offer support. >> they're passing notes saying you should ask this followup question. or look at this page in your text so that you can reference this piece of evidence to support your idea. >> we have power but we also have power. >> reporter: to prepare theo for the debate the 8th graders have read several articles about freedom of speech. >> you can't just say what you are saying because you feel like that's rightment you need to like have evidence about it. >> you said that the government, that we have more power than the government. >> reporter: teacher erin gary keeps score. >> kids collect points for
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 4:00pm PST
educators were killed nearly a year ago when the gunman started shooting in classrooms. central african republic is a landlocked country of some and descending into chaos. that's the warning from the united nations. fighters from a muslim rebel roup are being blamed for a series of brutal results to christian communities. and sent us this report and contains graphic violence which you may find disturbing. silence is haunting and unbroken. hundreds of miles. villages, burned villages. and the eerie sense of a nation hiding. three nervous ghost-like figures. on the right ge says we thought the rebels. six kidshis family has and the rest of the village are hiding out here in the bushes. back towards come the road. we're going to go and see them now. >> as word spreads, others koerb us.ally approach months of conflict here in the forced african republic perhaps 400,000 people to run for their lives. hey're stand ied, increasingly desperate and far from help. youngest lls his daughter last week. and her brother was killed also. animals here, no clean water. food. to the on road, and far outh
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
to multiracial education. back then, she was really scared when nelson mandela was freed from prison. will we be able to move around the way we used to? will we be thrown into jail? we started talking and reassured people that this country will work together and there is never going to be a thing like apartheid in south africa. of a handfulories of south africans who lived through the worst of times, there are thousands, possibly millions that have similar stories to tell. -- a handful ofs of of south africans who lived through the worst of times, there are thousands, possibly millions that have similar stories to tell. to see the new free south africa, you just have to look around. in a short reaction while. we will talk a little bit about president obama, bill gates already playing tribute and the u.s. secretary-general. you have just seen that moving piece by james. want to talkle and want to pay tribute and want to recognize what happened to them on that day was changed millions of lives. >> that is absolutely right. every south african, regardless of their political view, was touched by
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm PST
and a publishing and education company. twitter was criticized for not having any female directors on the all while-male bored. the news came by tweet and she responded with her first tweet saying it's an exciting time in twitter's history. >>> today is the 17th anniversary of alan green span's comment. remember that? it was about sharply rising stock prices. so how much has changed in the march gets since then, and what companies right now may be seeing exuberance in share prices if the bottom line share a different story? dominic chu has more. >> reporter: 17 years ago, two words were forever eached into the history books of financial markets, irrational, exuberance. >> how do we know whennish rational exuberance has unduly escalated which becomes subject to unexpected and prolonged contractions? >> reporter: former federal reserve chairman used the term to characterize the market. things back then were not that different than they are now. sure, the s askand p 500 were closing to 1800 today but evaluations today were close to what they were in 1996. there are some companies they may be kpub rant
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 7:00pm PST
ceo, glen murphy, gap ceo and macy's chief merchandising officer. he says to move into education, it's hard to consider him working for anyone else, but if he would be willing, he would be a big get. there is always a chance for a christmas miracle. for nightly business report, i'm courtney regan. >>> sears is spinning off the lands end units, speaking of retail and that's where we begin tonight's market focus. they filed with the fcc to establish for the value of land's end but the bored of directors needs to sign off. this is the latest effort to get back on track as it faces mounding losses and declining sales. shares of sears holdings down nearly 4% to $48.09 today. another retailer, j.c. penney facing an inquiry into the finances. regulators investigating the controversial 800 million dollar stock offering this fall. the agency requested information on the liquid did, cash and equity in debt. shares plunged 9% today falling to $8.08. >>> j.c. penney wasn't alone. shares of barnes & noble tumbled today on word it's under investigation by the securities and exchange commission. th
PBS
Dec 7, 2013 5:30pm PST
an education, who have made a real investment in trying to secure better careers and are stuck with a waitressing or retail job there are a lot of implications with that. they may have student loans they cannot pay off. that increases their probability of defaulting on the loans. they also lower their lifetime earnings potential. the center for american progress did a study on the long term implications of this. and they found that for the 1 million americans who are young and who are unemploymented because of the great recession they probably lost a collective $20 billion in earnings for the next 10 years. >> what about the larger part of the economy? >> if you have young people living with relatives and friends, couch surfing, renting instead of buying a home because they don't have the money to do that or the credit built up to do that or have bad credit, that pushes back the time line where they can buy a home and if they do it at all. it also had a big implication for consumer spend coming is the biggest part of our economy. if people are earning less over their lifetime t
PBS
Dec 3, 2013 12:00am PST
will shower them and its american funding will shower them with education and health-care systems and road systems. and everything else, bombard them with kindness, goodness, health and hope. i don't know how you end up hating someone who does that. if i can get saul to manipulate the fictionalized version of the middle east, the israeli and palestinian people to somehow, you know, both the united states and all israel to shores with gaza and west bank with aid, education and kindness, i would find it interested to see who will get angry about that in the other side n the fictional world a if it could go not real world, look, man, great presidents read shakespeare for ideas. they read imson, they raid the classics. the classics come from people, just people like our writers, just people like you and me. >> do you wish you could have this conversation with the in the. >> i'm hoping he's watching! >> rose: he might be. he might be. >> of course i wish it. of course i wish it. to me it's a thrill that i am in a piece that's actually watched by presidents. this-- this is a piece that both clin
PBS
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am PST
was trying to bring a revolution to my country and educate my own people about democracy and freedom and i hadn't been able to do that to my wife or my mother and he felt that was a lack, and they just went their separate ways and it was a sad situation. >> rose: and then there was. >> then he met win any, and when you see pictures of when any, just a gorgeous woman, full of strength and pride and. >> rose: she was an activist? >> an activist in her own right and what happened was at that particular moment in time, the two of them just clicked and became such an indelible force but with the celebration of all the documentation on mandela being imprisoned 27 years, you know, a lot of times credit is not given to what winney had to endure because those early years of prison, they would go up to the house 2:00 o'clock in the morning and shake her down, strip search her, i.an those two girls were 3 and 1, four and two, and, you know, a lot of people don't remember that you talk about courage and strength, i mean she was in solitary confinement for 18 months, winny, but after 27 years in prison
PBS
Dec 2, 2013 6:00pm PST
your public television station to ask for your support. and that sueactions from state education officials. >> woodruff: finally tonight: this year's national book award for fiction went to a novel that re-tells a very familiar story from american history with a thoroughly new twist. jeff is back with that. >> brown: "i was born a colored man and don't you forget it. but i lived as a colored woman for 17 years." the words of kansas-born slave henry or henrietta schackleford who in the novel "the good lord bird" becomes one of the rag-tag followers of the abolitionist john brown and survives to tell of the raid on harper's ferry. this is the third novel by james mcbride. he's also author of the bestselling memoir, "the color of water: a black man's tribute to his white mother." first, congratulations to you. >> thank you very much. >> so the story has been written and written about in nonfiction and fiction. you, what, felt you had something more to tell? >> well, i wanted to tell it in a funny way and i wanted people to, you know, know about them. and i wanted-- i tried to come u
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 3:00pm PST
children and six educators were shot to death by 20-year- old adam lanza. a judge ordered the audio material released under the state's freedom of information law. the suspected gunman in the deadly shooting at los angeles international airport has made his first court appearance. paul ciancia entered no plea today to charges he killed an airport security officer and wounded three other people last month. he was denied bail. the 23-year-old suspect was wounded by police during the attack. in economic news, a survey of leading corporate chief executives found they're more optimistic and plan to increase hiring. at the same time, growth at service sector companies last month was the weakest since june. the conflicting data left wall street looking for direction. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 25 points to close at 15,889. the nasdaq rose a fraction of a point to close at 4,038. there's word today that the great majority of american silent films are now gone forever. the library of congress reported 70% of the 11,000 feature-length movies have been lost or destroyed. only
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)